PHOTO CREDIT: Mayo Clinic

Biomedical Research News

  • Top Ways Regenerative Medicine is Advancing the Health Care of Tomorrow

    Regenerative medicine accelerated from the bench into the practice in new ways in 2019, ushering in an era of care focused on the body’s amazing ability to heal itself. “The regenerative toolkit keeps on expanding concomitantly, and applications of regenerative medicine into practice is increasingly broadening to more conditions that benefit more patients. Across Mayo Clinic sites and specialties, from neurosurgery, neurology, otorhinolaryngology, pulmonary medicine, cardiology and cardiac surgery to cancer and musculoskeletal care, women’s health and plastic surgery, medicine, laboratory medicine and radiology, this year has seen remarkable achievements,” says Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., director of Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine. Bolstered by robust research, Mayo Clinic is at the forefront of delivering new therapies that restore form and function to diseased cells, tissues, or organs — and ultimately to the individual as a whole. Regenerative medicine is redefining clinical care, going beyond mitigating disease symptoms to addressing the underlying cause. Mayo Clinic aspires to cure, connect and transform through new regenerative therapies grounded in rigorous science and in line with regulatory standards for quality and compliance. Within the next decade, regenerative medicine is predicted to account for 10% of all clinical care.

    Read more at mayoclinic.org
  • Mayo Clinic Regenerative Medicine on the International Stage

    Mayo Clinic experts shared their leadership and knowledge of regenerative medicine with an international audience at the World Stem Cell Summit in Miami. Every year more than 2,000 physicians, scientists, bioethicists, industry, government watchdogs and patient advocates from 44 countries convene at the World Stem Cell Summit to collaborate and focus on ways to advance emerging regenerative sciences. “This conference attracts some of the most preeminent minds in regenerative medicine and is representative of the field’s eco system. It’s a chance to share our latest research and newest applications of validated regenerative procedures,” says Shane Shapiro, M.D., medical director of Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine Therapeutic Suites at Mayo’s Jacksonville, Florida campus. Dr. Shapiro and fellow speakers Dr. Terzic and Dr. Qu receive funding from Gerstner Philanthropies.

    Read more about the summit at mayoclinic.org
  • Gerstner Award Program Supports Novel ADHD Research
    November 26, 2019

    A unique scholarship award program at Massachusetts General Hospital is helping advance the understanding and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) – the most common neurobehavioral disorder in children. The Louis V. Gerstner III Research Scholar Award Program was founded in 2014 to support early-career physician-scientists interested in pursuing new ideas related to this pervasive and often misunderstood disease. Now in its fifth year, the program honors the memory of Louis V. Gerstner III, former president of the Gerstner Family Foundation, and a tireless advocate for education and child welfare, who passed away in 2013. Over the last two decades, research has led to improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD, as well as a deeper understanding of the genetic and environmental factors that play a role in its development. In spite of the progress however, children with ADHD are still more likely to incur serious injury and suffer from learning disabilities and mood disorders. They are also at higher risk of developing substance use disorders. “To make a difference for this patient population, we need a greater understanding of ADHD and the role it plays in related conditions like substance use disorder – and that demands more research,” says Amy Yule, MD, one of two inaugural Gerstner Scholars in 2014 and medical director of the Addiction Recovery Management Service (ARMS) at Mass General. “The Gerstner Scholars Program recognizes the importance of launching independent investigators in this field.”

    Read more at massgeneral.org
  • 19 Undergraduates Complete the 2019 Summer Research Program at Gerstner Sloan Kettering Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

    Nineteen undergraduates who are interested in a career in biomedical science completed the 2019 Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) at the Gerstner Sloan Kettering Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSK). The highly competitive program gives outstanding college students the opportunity to perform hands-on research in cutting-edge biomedical research laboratories at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. The Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, sponsors SURP, a ten-week research program for outstanding undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing a career in the biomedical sciences.

    Read more at mskcc.org
  • We Need More Doctors Who Are Scientists
    September 25, 2019

    Unfortunately, the career path of the physician-scientist has become longer and a lot less appealing. In the United States, about 20,000 graduates emerge from medical school each year, many with significant debt. Many physicians are well into their 30s by the time they complete their clinical training. Doctors who decide to take the research path face the daunting prospect of many more years struggling to win grants and establish a lab. According to N.I.H. statistics, researchers with medical degrees on average receive their first major N.I.H. grant only at age 45. Recognizing the problem, the National Institutes of Health’s Physician-Scientist Workforce report, published in 2014, laid out a road map to address it. Nonetheless, the number of young doctors pursuing research continues to wane.

    Read more at nytimes.com